GUTS

Do you have the guts to read about your own insides?

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REVIEWS:

NSTA (National Science Teachers Association)

Outstanding Science Trade Book for Students K-12 (2006)

Outstanding Science Trade Book for Students K-12 (2006)

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KIRKUS REVIEWS

Guts has a lot going for it. In addition to its charmingly pithy title, it’s decorated with any number of computer-enhanced Technicolor photographs of innards and bears the predominantly white-on-black design that is Simon’s trademark. It’s also written in standard…

Guts has a lot going for it. In addition to its charmingly pithy title, it's decorated with any number of computer-enhanced Technicolor photographs of innards and bears the predominantly white-on-black design that is Simon's trademark. It's also written in standard Simon prose: By now, the author has perfected the art of boiling down the complexities of science into a simple, declarative sequence that, in this case, leads readers from the mouth to the anus. Along the way, they will learn of the dizzying variety of glands and goos that go into the digestive process, as well as the many organs from the epiglottis to the appendix. While the text would almost certainly have been improved by a pronunciation guide (how many child readers will know exactly what to do with "chyme"?) and would definitely have been improved by a bibliography or list of added resources, it does its job as efficiently as its subject does. Simon's books remain blessedly free of distracting sidebars and other trendy bells and whistles, and that simplicity in itself may be one of the keys to his enduring success. (Nonfiction. 5-12)

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BOOKLIST, Hazel Rochman

Gr. 5-8. The latest in Simon’s books about the human body explains how the digestive system works. In his signature style, accessible without being cute or condescending, he describes the complex facts and processes of the physiology, from the time…

Gr. 5-8. The latest in Simon's books about the human body explains how the digestive system works. In his signature style, accessible without being cute or condescending, he describes the complex facts and processes of the physiology, from the time food enters the mouth until all the various organs transform it into energy, nutrients, and waste. Some of the text is quite dense, but the clearly labeled, full-page color photos show the anatomy close-up, from an X-ray of the colon and a photo of a dissected pancreas to a microscopic view of what heartburn looks like in the stomach. Simon also includes a page about a healthy diet. The facts of how the body works are astonishing. Readers older than the target audience may want to look at this, too.
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved.

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SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, Sandra Welzenbach, Villarreal Elementary School, San Antonio, TX

Grade 4-6. Simon’s specialty of drawing in readers through large, detailed, breathtaking photos and then entertaining them with facts is again in evidence. Beginning with the teeth, esophagus, and stomach, the information then winds its way through the small and…

Grade 4-6. Simon's specialty of drawing in readers through large, detailed, breathtaking photos and then entertaining them with facts is again in evidence. Beginning with the teeth, esophagus, and stomach, the information then winds its way through the small and large intestines, with the importance of the pancreas and liver included. The text is enhanced with detailed colored X rays, computer-generated pictures, and microscopic photos. The material is detailed, with terminology that may be difficult for children with no background, but not sophisticated enough to need a medical degree for interpretation. Students will find the book fascinating as well as a bit gross. Writers of health-related reports, as well as casual browsers, will surely put this title to use.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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CHILDREN'S LITERATURE, Cindy L. Carolan

Just as a car uses gasoline, motor oil and other fluids, our bodies need water and food to operate. Generally, we put these things in our bodies and then forget about them. An amazing process is really just beginning with…

Just as a car uses gasoline, motor oil and other fluids, our bodies need water and food to operate. Generally, we put these things in our bodies and then forget about them. An amazing process is really just beginning with each bit of food, one that is examined in detail in this highly-educational and interesting book about the digestive system. So many questions posed by children are answered in a straightforward manner. For example, how is it that the hydrochloric acid, which is a gastric juice the helps to soften food, does not eat away the walls of our stomachs? The answer is that the stomach is lined with a coating of protective mucus that is replaced every three or four days. Each spread contains one page of text and one full page of photographs or illustrations, actual shots of the surface of the inside of a stomach, the esophagus covered in mucus and colored X-rays body parts such as the colon and the coiled-up loops of the small intestine. These representations are definitely for the science minded and not the fainthearted. The author has written more than 200 science books, many of which are award winning publications. Highly recommended.

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