Label: Science Dictionary

January 13, 2013

Thank you to everyone who entered the second MY AWESOME SCIENCE WORD contest. We enjoyed seeing the choices you made and reading your writing using those words. Nealy 100 students and classes entered this contest - that is a lot of excellent research and writing!

  As promised, we have selected two winners of this contest, and both will receive an autographed copy of the newly updated edition of Seymour Simon’s SCIENCE DICTIONARY, which was published by Dover Books on December 19th.

 

Are you ready? Here are the winners of Seymour Simon’s 2nd Awesome Science Word contest:

Individual Winner: Brandon/4th Grade, Penn Valley Elementary, Ms. Kochersperger’s class                         

  Awesome Science Word: Zircon

Definition: Zircons are solid minerals that come in many different colors and can be transparent (see through) crystals used as gemstones.

Why you think it is awesome: I think the word zircon is awesome, not only because of how the word looks and sounds, but also because I like learning about different minerals found in the Earth.

Use the word in a sentence: Yesterday, my friends and I went to a cave full of crystals and my favorite one was a green, transparent zircon.

 

 

Classroom Winner: Mrs. Caron’s 2nd Grade Class, Oxford Valley Elementary School

  Awesome Science Word: Dry Ice

Definition: Dry ice is frozen carbon dioxide that is -107 degrees Fahrenheit or colder.

Why you think it is awesome: Dry ice is interesting because it keeps food cold while it gets shipped to your house.

Use the word in a sentence: When a metal spoon touches dry ice, it makes a high-pitched, squeaky sound.

 

 

Both winners will receive a personally autographed copy of Seymour Simon’s SCIENCE DICTIONARY. Congratulations to everyone who entered! 

Posted by: Seymour Simon

(0) Comments  •   Labels: School Visits, Contests, Science Dictionary   •  Permalink (link to this article)

January 6, 2013

Seymour Simon is heading back to Pennsylvania and visiting six more schools this coming week. As promised, we are running our contest again for students  in the Pennsbury school district. Welcome to the AWESOME SCIENCE WORD contest!

Two lucky winners are going to receive personally autographed copies of Seymour Simon’s newly updated SCIENCE DICTIONARY, with more than 2,000 entries!

Did you ever spend time browsing through an encyclopedia or dictionary? You might not have been looking for a specific word but just leafing through, finding cool topics and reading about them. For this contest Seymour Simon invites you to browse through his online Science Dictionary and find a word or image that you really like. Here is the link where you can find his Science Dictionary online: http://www.seymoursimon.com/index.php/science_dictionary/

Here is what you need to know to enter Seymour’s Awesome Science Word Contest:

Take a look around in the online Science Dictionary and find a word that you think is an Awesome Science Word. Once you have decided on your word, you have to do three things:

1. Tell us what your word is and explain the definition in your own words.

 2. Tell us why you think your word is awesome.

3. Use your Awesome Science Word in a sentence to prove that you really understand what it means.

 

Here is an example. Let’s say that I look at the online Dictionary pick "geyser" as my Awesome Science Word. I would write:

Definition in my own words: A geyser is a hot, underground pool or stream of water that sometimes explodes into the air, releasing hot water and steam.

Why it is awesome: I think it is awesome that hot water, smoke and steam can just explode out of the ground without any warning.

Using it in a sentence: If you ever go to Yellowstone National Park, don’t walk too near the "Old Faithful" geyser, because you never know when it is going to blow!

 

Here is how to enter once you have selected your Awesome Science Word:

A. Click on the yellow "Comments" link at the bottom of this blog to enter the contest by sharing your word along with your definition, why you think it is awesome, and your sentence using your word.

B. When you write you information, be sure to also tell us your name (first name only), your school, and your teacher’s name. That way we can find you if you are the winner!

C. Be sure to post your entry by midnight on Friday, January 11th. The contest ends then.

 

RULES:

  • Two winners in the Pennsbury Schools will be chosen randomly from all the correct entries. 
  • Older students may enter individually, and we will pick one winner. 
  • Students in grades K-2 may enter as a class and work with their teacher to enter the contest; there will be one classroom winner. 
  • Both winners will receive copies of the printed version of the SCIENCE DICTIONARY, autographed by Seymour Simon.
  • Students who are not in the Pennsbury (Pennsylvania) school district may also enter this contest. If we have at least 20 entries from other schools, we will randomly choose a third prizewinner from the non-Pennsylvania entries. 

This new book is completely updated, and was just published by Dover Books on December 19.

So, get to work and send us your entries today. Good luck!

Posted by: Seymour Simon

(79) Comments  •   Labels: School Visits, Contests, Science Dictionary   •  Permalink (link to this article)

December 5, 2012

Seymour Simon is preparing to travel to visit five schools in Pennsylvania next week. It is easy to tell because we are seeing so many new readers on the Seymour Science blog. Students in the Pennsbury school district - this AWESOME SCIENCE WORD contest is for you!

Two lucky winners are going to receive personally autographed copies of Seymour Simon’s newly updated SCIENCE DICTIONARY, with more than 2,000 entries!

Did you ever spend time browsing through an encyclopedia or dictionary? You might not have been looking for a specific word but just leafing through, finding cool topics and reading about them. For this contest Seymour Simon invites you to browse through his online Science Dictionary and find a word or image that you really like. Here is the link where you can find his Science Dictionary online: http://www.seymoursimon.com/index.php/science_dictionary/

Here is what you need to know to enter Seymour’s Awesome Science Word Contest:

Take a look around in the online Science Dictionary and find a word that you think is an Awesome Science Word. Once you have decided on your word, you have to do three things:

1. Tell us what your word is and explain the definition in your own words.

 2. Tell us why you think your word is awesome.

3. Use your Awesome Science Word in a sentence to prove that you really understand what it means.

 

Here is an example. Let’s say that I look at the online Dictionary pick "geyser" as my Awesome Science Word. I would write:

Definition in my own words: A geyser is a hot, underground pool or stream of water that sometimes explodes into the air, releasing hot water and steam.

Why it is awesome: I think it is awesome that hot water, smoke and steam can just explode out of the ground without any warning.

Using it in a sentence: If you ever go to Yellowstone National Park, don’t walk too near the "Old Faithful" geyser, because you never know when it is going to blow!

 

Here is how to enter once you have selected your Awesome Science Word:

A. Click on the yellow "Comments" link at the bottom of the blog to enter the contest by sharing your word along with your definition, why you think it is awesome, and your sentence using your word.

B. When you write you information, be sure to also tell us your name (first name only), your school, and your teacher’s name. That way we can find you if you are the winner!

C. Be sure to post your entry by midnight on Thursday, December 13. The contest ends then.

 

RULES:

  • Two winners in the Pennsbury Schools will be chosen randomly from all the correct entries. 
  • Older students may enter individually, and we will pick one winner. 
  • Students in grades K-2 may enter as a class and work with their teacher to enter the contest; there will be one classroom winner. 
  • Both winners will receive copies of the printed version of the SCIENCE DICTIONARY, autographed by Seymour Simon.
  • Students who are not in the Pennsbury (Pennsylvania) school district may also enter this contest. If we have at least 20 entries from other schools, we will randomly choose a third prizewinner from the non-Pennsylvania entries. 

This new book is completely updated, and being published by Dover Books on December 19.

So, get to work and send us your entries today. Good luck!

Posted by: Seymour Simon

(158) Comments  •   Labels: School Visits, Contests, Science Dictionary   •  Permalink (link to this article)

February 9, 2012

 

Did you know that Seymour Simon’s SCIENCE DICTIONARY is available on his website for you? Here is an interesting definition from the Science Dictionary that may have come up in the research that many of you have been doing this week for your contest entries. Have you come across these words - Kuiper Belt? This is what the Kuiper Belt looks like.

Now click here for Seymour’s definition, to help you understand what Kuiper Belt means. 

Posted by: Seymour Simon

(2) Comments  •   Labels: Solar System, space, Science Dictionary, Pluto   •  Permalink (link to this article)

February 15, 2011

A Pennsylvania student named Marissa wrote this week with an unusual question. "I was wondering, what is your favorite fish? Mine is the Blobfish."

 

I happen to love fish. My favorite fish is known as "The Ram." Its scientific name is Epistograma ramarezi, and it is a dwarf cichlid. Cichlids (pronounced SIH-clid) are freshwater fish found in the tropical Americas, Africa and Asia, somewhat similar to our North American sunfish. The ram is a beautiful little fish that swims around with a great deal of determination. It is gorgeous when it is in breeding condition - a sparkly blue and red. I used to have tropical aquariums and I bred these fish and sold them. So now you know that I really like fish!

If you want to see Marissa’s favorite, the blobfish (Psychrolutes marcidus), you can find a photo in my Science Dictionary under the definition of DEEP.....which might tell you something about where these very unusual creatures live!

  

Posted by: Seymour Simon

(3) Comments  •   Labels: Animals, School Visits, Oceans, Kids comments, Science Dictionary   •  Permalink (link to this article)

February 4, 2011

Kids all across America have had plenty of snow days this winter, with a series record-setting snowstorms that started back in December. Today, even kids from Texas to the Carolinas are having a snow day.

It sounds like a good time to settle in, make yourself a cup of cocoa, and browse Seymour’s online Science Dictionary. You can start with the entry for SNOWFLAKE!

Posted by: Liz Nealon

(1) Comments  •   Labels: science news, Climate Change, Cool Photo, Weather, Science Dictionary, Winter, climate   •  Permalink (link to this article)

October 27, 2010

As I continue to edit and update my Science Dictionary , I’m loving the fact that it is a living, online document which I can improve and expand as kids are exposed to new scientific ideas, language, and breakthroughs. 

Giant Leopard Moth

The fact that I can add images makes it even more fun! This gorgeous creature is a Giant Leopard Moth, also called the Eyed Tiger Moth (Hypercompe scribonia). It is found throughout Southern and Eastern North America, from New England to Mexico. This species is a big one, with a wingspan of almost 3 inches (8 cm). Like most moths, it is nocturnal and only flies after nightfall.

                         

If your kids (or students) haven’t yet discovered my online Science Dictionary, check it out with them today. It’s there as a resource for them to use with their homework, as well as to entice them to browse, enjoy and learn. 

 

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedian Kevincollins123 

Posted by: Seymour Simon

(0) Comments  •   Labels: New Books, Science Dictionary   •  Permalink (link to this article)

September 21, 2010

 

As teachers and students settle into the new school year here in North America, I’m busy doing my homework — editing and revising my Science Dictionary. It is now available and searchable for kids on my website, and we’ve added lots of new photos to entice casual browsers. It is also being re-published next year by Dover. So, it’s time for an update.

 

My process has certainly changed since I first wrote the Dictionary just over 15 years ago. The first time around it took me several years to write it, because I had to research over 2,000 entries by hand, at the library. Now, with the Internet, I am revising and updating the entire volume in a matter of months. That’s what I call progress!

Speaking of progress, the list of new entries has made me realize how much of a scientific and technological revolution we’ve experienced since I first published this book, back in 1994. New entries (which either didn’t exist or weren’t relevant to kids 15 years ago) include: Internetavatarcell phone, International Space StationHubble Space TelescopeGPS, global warmingdigitalforensic scienceCT-Scanoil pollution....the list goes on and on. And of course, Pluto is re-defined as a "dwarf planet, an object in the Kuiper Belt."

 

One of the great things about publishing on the Internet is that it’s a fluid, evolving media. That means it is possible to continue tweaking, adding, revising and updating my Science Dictionary. So, if there are words that you think should be included, send me a note or comment here.

 

 

 

Posted by: Seymour Simon

(0) Comments  •   Labels: New Books, Teachers and Librarians, Writing, Science Dictionary   •  Permalink (link to this article)

March 10, 2010

 

Have you ever heard the word "clowder"? It means "a group of cats."  So, if you have more than one cat in your house, your pets are a clowder of cats.

 

A group of kittens is referred to as a "kendle." So, that is a kendle of kittens on the cover of my book CATS! 


Posted by: Seymour Simon

(0) Comments  •   Labels: Animals, Cats, Pets, Science Dictionary   •  Permalink (link to this article)