Label: Writing Wednesday

September 5, 2012

Good morning, and welcome to Writing Wednesday, where every week there is a new opportunity to publish your creative writing on the Seymour Science blog. This week, we are asking you to read an excerpt from Seymour’s newest book, SEYMOUR SIMON’S EXTREME EARTH RECORDS, and then help other readers of this blog learn more about the Hottest Place on Earth.

 


  


Your assignment: Do research, using Seymour Simon’s Extreme Earth Records, other books in your library or the Internet, to find out why the hottest place on Earth is called "Death Valley." Write two or three paragraphs telling other readers of the Seymour Science blog how the hottest place on Earth, Death Valley, got its name. Use action verbs and strong adjectives to help your readers understand what it might feel like to be in the Hottest Place on Earth.

When you are finished writing, click on the yellow "Comments" at the bottom of this post to enter your writing!


Note to Educators: Today’s Writing Wednesday exercise is designed to use in support of CCSS Writing Anchor Standard #4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 

Posted by: Liz Nealon

(1) Comments  •   Labels: Writing Wednesday, Earth Science Books, Extreme Earth   •  Permalink (link to this article)

June 6, 2012

Welcome to our last Writing Wednesday of the school year! Today, we’re going to do a five-minute writing warm-up, with two simple rules:

1.    Give us the best you’ve got in 5 minutes. That’s right - five minutes of creative writing. Think of it as a word extravaganza to warm up your brain for the rest of the day!

2.    Tell us your first name and what state you live in.

  Ready? Let’s go! Today, we would like you to look at the photograph below. Write five strong, colorful words that you think best describe this photograph of a jellyfish that was the "Fan Favorite" in the University of Miami’s underwater photo competition. Your writing could be serious, or it could be funny. Either approach is fine, as long as what you write makes the reader want to know more! Write your 5 descriptive words and submit them by clicking on the "Comments" below. Happy writing!

Photo: Todd Aki

Posted by: Liz Nealon

(10) Comments  •   Labels: Writing Wednesday, Oceans   •  Permalink (link to this article)

May 30, 2012

Good morning, and welcome to Writing Wednesday, where every week there is a new opportunity to publish your creative writing on the Seymour Science blog. This week, we are asking you to read an excerpt from Seymour Simon’s book WHY DO PUPPIES DO THAT?, and then write a convincing letter about why you want to have a dog.


From WHY DO PUPPIES DO THAT?, by Seymour Simon

  

 

Getting a puppy is a big decision. Taking care of a puppy takes a lot of time and attention. When puppies grow into adult dogs they still need love and attention from their owners. 

         Puppies offer so much in return for your affection. They are great fun to play with and always are ready to be your companion. They can cheer you up when you feel sad or lonely. They have helpful barks that can let you know someone’s at the door, or even warn you of danger. Perhaps best of all, caring for a puppy teaches you the value of loving and being loved.

 

 


Your assignment: Do you agree that dogs are more than just pets, but friends too? Have you ever wanted a pet dog, but you are not allowed to have one? Write a letter to an adult asking them to get you a dog. Think about several reasons why dogs make great pets, and decide what kind of dog you would want. Be sure to give plenty of solid facts about dogs in order to make a great case for yourself. You might also want to explain how to care for a dog, and the responsibilities that come with being a dog owner. Who knows, maybe you will have a canine friend before you know it!

When you are finished writing, click on the yellow "Comments" at the bottom of this post to enter your writing!

 

Photo: Kai Chiang


Note to Educators: Today’s Writing Wednesday exercise is designed to use in support of CCSS standard W.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Posted by: Seymour Simon

(12) Comments  •   Labels: Common Core, Writing Wednesday, Dogs, Pets, Puppies   •  Permalink (link to this article)

May 23, 2012

Good morning, and welcome to Writing Wednesday, where every week there is a new opportunity to publish your creative writing on the Seymour Science blog. This week, we are asking you to read an excerpt from Seymour Simon’s book ANIMALS NOBODY LOVES, and then do your own research about sharks!


From ANIMALS NOBODY LOVES, by Seymour Simon

  

 

The shark is the most feared animal in the sea. Some sharks are large and dangerous. Others are just a few feet long and eat small fish. Sharks come in many different sizes, shapes and colors. Hammerheads, tiger sharks, and mako sharks have powerful jaws and razor-sharp teeth. Some sharks can bite three hundred times harder than a human.

         The most dangerous shark is the great white shark. It usually swims in the open sea. But sometimes a great white shark may attach and kill swimmers with no warning. It may even attack small boats. Its large, saw-edged teeth can rip through wood and even metal. The great white shark has a huge appetite and will eat any animal or person that it finds in its path.


Your assignment: After reading about this misunderstood animal, do some research of your own. Decide whether you agree or disagree with the author’s point of view. Go to the library or use the Internet to find other sources that will help you learn about sharks. Are these animals worthy of love, or are they just a menace? Give details and solid evidence to support your opinion.

When you are finished writing, click on the yellow "Comments" at the bottom of this post to enter your writing!

 

Photo: Al Giddings


Note to Educators

Note to Educators: Today’s Writing Wednesday exercise is designed to use in support of CCSS standards RI.8: Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text; W.1: Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons; and W.7: Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

Posted by: Liz Nealon

(9) Comments  •   Labels: Writing Wednesday, Animals Nobody Loves, Sharks   •  Permalink (link to this article)

May 9, 2012

Welcome to Writing Wednesday! Every week there is a new opportunity to publish your own creative writing on the Seymour Science blog. This week, we are asking you to do your own research, and explain what is happening in the photograph below.

 

The Facts: 

It is spring, and all over the world, bees like this one are drinking nectar from apple blossoms and other spring flowers. When a bee travels from flower to flower, it is moving pollen from one flower to another.

 

Your Assignment: Working with a partner or several of your classmates, find out about bees, how they help to pollinate flowers, and why that is important for us who eventually eat the fruits and vegetables that come from these flowers. You can use books in your library or sources on the Internet to do your research. Then, write a paragraph explaining pollination and post it here by clicking on the yellow "Comments" button below.

Happy writing!


       

Educators: Today’s Writing Wednesday is designed to use in support of CCSS Anchor Standard W.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

 

 

Posted by: Liz Nealon

(2) Comments  •   Labels: Common Core, Writing Wednesday, Insects   •  Permalink (link to this article)

May 4, 2012

Occasionally we receive such a strong piece of Writing Wednesday work that we publish it for everyone to read. This excellent piece of research and writing was done by Miss Kyle’s 4th Grade Class at Shoemaker Elementary school in Macungie, PA. Terrific work, everybody!  


 

All of the creatures in this picture are alive and exist in a symbiotic relationship. Being close to the same color helps the coral and the goby fish to work together. The coral reproduces among itself and is always creating a new habitat, as well as food, for the sea creatures, The coral becomes shelter for the fish and at the same time provides protection from predators. These predators might include; dolphins, whales, sharks, larger fish, jelly fish and crabs. The sea anemone hiding inside the coral is poisonous to other fish and makes predators stay away from the goby’s hiding place. In summary, these creatures all depend on one another to be able to survive in the ocean.

 

Posted by: Seymour Simon

(0) Comments  •   Labels: Writing Wednesday, Coral Reefs, Fish   •  Permalink (link to this article)

May 2, 2012

Welcome to Writing Wednesday! Every week there is a new opportunity to publish your own creative writing on the Seymour Science blog.

This week, we are asking you to describe the scene in this photograph, using what you know or what you can learn about life on Coral Reefs.

The Facts: The fish in this photograph are Yellownose gobies, and one is peeking out from its hiding spot inside the folds of a brain coral.  

Your assignment: Write a paragraph explaining the relationship between the animals. Which one needs the other to provide camouflage? What predators is it being protected from?

How to make your writing powerful: Coral reefs are like underwater cities, teeming with life. Use descriptive details to make this ocean world come alive for your reader.

 

When you are finished writing, click on the yellow "Comments" at the bottom of this post to enter your writing.

 

Photo: Todd Minthz

Posted by: Liz Nealon

(3) Comments  •   Labels: Writing Wednesday, Coral Reefs, Oceans, Fish   •  Permalink (link to this article)

April 25, 2012

Welcome to Writing Wednesday! Every week there is a new opportunity to publish your own creative writing on the Seymour Science blog. This week, we are asking you to read a science news story about a long-lost soccer ball, and then answer a question about that story.

The Facts:

  It is a good thing that Misaki Murakami’s name was on his soccer ball. He thought it was lost in last year’s tsunami in Japan, but it was returned to him after it washed up on an island in Alaska last weekend.

15-year-old Misaki Murakami was home when the tsunami struck Japan in March 2011, and he grabbed his pet dog and ran to safety on higher ground. His family lost everything, including their house, and have been living in temporary housing ever since. 

Misaki and his family members have been looking for their belongings, but the soccer ball is the first thing that has been found. His name and the name of his school were written on the ball with a Sharpie because this was not just any old soccer ball. It was a goodbye gift from his teacher and classmates when he had to change schools seven years ago. He has kept it next to his bed ever since.

Your Assignment: Once you have read and understood the story above, answer this question. Why was it so surprising that Misaki got his soccer ball back, and why was it important to him? Click "comments" below to write your answer.

 

Photo: NOAA - Jiji Press / AFP


Educators: Today’s Writing Wednesday is designed to use in support of CCSS Anchor Standard W.8: Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

Posted by: Liz Nealon

(16) Comments  •   Labels: Common Core, science news, Writing Wednesday, Earthquakes, Oceans   •  Permalink (link to this article)

April 18, 2012

 

Good morning, and welcome to Writing Wednesday, where every week there is a new opportunity to publish your creative writing on the Seymour Science blog. This week, in honor of Earth Day, we are giving you a sneak preview of Seymour Simon’s upcoming book, SEYMOUR SIMON’S EXTREME EARTH RECORDS! After you read this excerpt, we’re going to ask you to do your own descriptive writing, and imagine what it would be like if you could visit the Coldest Place on Earth! 

 

 


From SEYMOUR SIMON’S EXTREME EARTH RECORDS:

     

     When you step off the plane onto the rocky ice, you will immediately struggle with challenges that will last anywhere from one to eight weeks, as you acclimate yourself to the coldest place on Earth, Vostok Research Station in Antarctica.

     Vostok Station is a lonely, windblown outpost 621 miles (1,000 kilometers) from the South Pole. It holds the record for the lowest recorded temperature on Earth, -128.6ºF (-89.2ºC), recorded in July 1983. Twice a year, tractor-train (a train of tractor trucks) expeditions take as long as a month to crawl dangerously over the cracked, icy landscape carrying food and supplies to about a dozen Russian, American, and French scientists who live there during the winter conducting a variety of experiments.


 

Your assignment: Read the excerpt above from Seymour Simon’s new book, and think about what it would be like to be at the Vostok Research Station. How would you feel? What would you see around you? Or hear all around you? Write at least three sentences that use your own words to describe a visit to the Coldest Place on Earth

When you are finished writing, click on the yellow "Comments" at the bottom of this post to enter your writing!

 


Note to Educators: Today’s Writing Wednesday exercise is designed to use in support of CCSS Writing Anchor Standard #9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

 

Posted by: Liz Nealon

(3) Comments  •   Labels: New Books, Common Core, Writing Wednesday, Earth Day 2012, Earth   •  Permalink (link to this article)

April 11, 2012

Good morning, and welcome to Writing Wednesday, where every week there is a new opportunity to publish your creative writing on the Seymour Science blog. This week, we are asking you to read an excerpt from Seymour Simon’s book GLOBAL WARMING, research your own facts and explain in your own words the point that he is making.

 


From GLOBAL WARMING, by Seymour Simon:

     Global warming has changed the feeding patterns and behaviors of polar bears, walruses, seals and whales. It may even impact their surval.

     Polar bears live only in the Arctic. They are completely dependent on the sea ice for all their life needs. In the winter, females give birth to cubs. The mother polar bear eats little or no food during the winter.

     As spring approaches, the bear family makes a run onto the sea ice to feed on seals, their main source of food. If the ice melts, their food supply will be cut off and this will impact their survival.

 


Your assignment: Can you find facts to support what Seymour Simon is saying on this page? Use other books in your library, articles about global warming from Seymour’s blog, or other Internet sources to learn about the melting of the Arctic ice. Write a few paragraphs that use your own words and information that you have found to either argue for or against the idea that the survival of polar bears is threatened by the melting of the Arctic ice.

When you are finished writing, click on the yellow "Comments" at the bottom of this post to enter your writing!

 


Note to Educators: Today’s Writing Wednesday exercise is designed to use in support of CCSS Writing Anchor Standard #1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

 

Posted by: Liz Nealon

(19) Comments  •   Labels: Common Core, Writing Wednesday, Animals, Global Warming, Climate Change, Conservation, Earth Day 2012   •  Permalink (link to this article)

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